2014 National Native Media Conference

For those of you that attended the 2014 National Native Media Conference, you know there were too many good workshops and panels to attend and ultimately, you missed out on one or two sessions you really wanted to go to.

We’re providing this online resource so you can refresh and catch up on what happened. 

If you weren’t able to attend, are looking to brush up on current issues, or hoping to learn more about reporting in Indian Country, take a few minutes to watch our first ever NAJA Talks video. The presentation features Pally Talahongva, Duncan McCue, Mark Trahant and Karen Lincoln Michel.

Russ Choma of The Reynolds Center for Business Journalism presented Tracking Tribal Cash and Influence to Washington - a training designed to help reporters tap into the world of money, influence and tribal impact in Washington. His Power Point Presentation is available here and a PDF on Tracking Tribal Cash Resources here.

Lam Thuy Vo and Joanna Kao from Al Jazeera America did a number of workshops including Data and Audience Engagement as well as High Quality, Low Cost Video Shooting and Editing

Tipsheets are available here: http://lamivo.com/videointerview.pdf http://lamivo.com/fiveshot_glossy.pdf http://lamivo.com/equipment_handout.pdf 

Also, take a few minutes to check out Duncan McCue’s presentation on Decolonizing Journalism Education, and YouTube Strategies for News.

Do you have additional resources or links from the 2014 National Native Media Conference that need to be here? Send an email to RebeccaLandsberry@naja.com and we’ll add it.

 

More than 300 attendees participated in the 2014 National Native Media Conference in Santa Clara, Calif.

Thank you to our NAJA members, co-hosts, partners and sponsors for making the annual conference the premier Native media event of 2014.

 

2014 National Native Media Conference

July 10-13 

Santa Clara, CA

"Going Tra-Digital"

From ancient petroglyphs and cave paintings to the Cherokee Phoenix, the first newspaper published in the U.S., in both English and Cherokee in 1828, Native Americans have always found ways to connect with each other in their unique languages. 

Native journalists combine print, audio and visual elements to tell their own stories in a fresh way, while preserving and maintaining their distinct cultural identities. By fusing traditional storytelling elements with the use of modern digital tools to deliver news, initiate social change through the education of citizens and empower media-makers covering Indian Country, the Native American Journalists Association (NAJA) will celebrate 30 years of the National Native Media Conference and “Going Tra-Digital” in Santa Clara, Calif., July 10-13, 2014.

Thank you to our 2014 National Native Media Conference sponsors!